2011年03月22日

東日本大震災、お年寄りの胸に去来する第二次大戦の恐怖


For Elderly, Echoes of World War II Horrors
( New York Times )

Hirosato Wako stared at the ruins of his small fishing hamlet: skeletons of shattered buildings, twisted lengths of corrugated steel, corpses with their hands twisted into claws. Only once before had he seen anything like it: World War II.

“I lived through the Sendai air raids,” said Mr. Wako, 75, referring to the Allied bombings of the northeast’s largest city. “But this is much worse.”

For the elderly who live in the villages lining Japan’s northeastern
coast, it is a return to a past of privation that their children have
never known. As in so much of the Japanese countryside, young people
have largely fled, looking for work in the city. The elderly who remained are facing devastation and possible radiation contamination, a challenge equal only to the task this generation faced when its defeated, despairing nation had to rebuild from the rubble of the war.


In this hamlet of Yuriage, the search for survivors was turning into a
search for bodies. And most of those bodies were old -- too old to have outrun the tsunami.

Yuta Saga, 21, was picking up broken cups after the earthquake when he heard sirens and screams of “Tsunami!” He grabbed his mother by the arm and ran to the junior high school, the tallest building around. Traffic snarled the streets as panicked drivers crashed into one another. He could measure the wave’s advance by the clouds of dust created by collapsing buildings.

When they reached the school, Mr. Saga and his mother found the stairs to the roof clogged with older people who appeared unable to muster the strength to climb them. Some were just sitting or lying on the steps. As the bottom floor filled with fleeing residents, the wave hit.

At first, the doors held. Then water began to pour through the seams and flow into the room. In a panic to reach the roof, younger residents began pushing and yelling, “Hurry!” and “Out of the way!” They climbed over those who were not moving, or elbowed them aside.

“I couldn’t believe it,” Mr. Saga said. “They were even shoving old people out of the way. The old people couldn’t save themselves.”

He added, “People didn’t care about others.”

Then the doors burst open, and the water rushed in. It was quickly waist level. Mr. Saga saw one older woman, without the strength or will to
stand, sitting in water that rose to her nose. He said he rushed behind her, grabbed her under the arms and hoisted her up the stairs. Another person on the stairs grabbed her and lifted her up to another person. The men formed a human chain, lifting the older residents and some children to the top.

“I saw the ugly side of people, and then I saw the good side,” he said. “Some people only thought of themselves. Others stopped to help.”

Mr. Saga said one woman handed him her infant. “Please, at least save the baby!” she pleaded as water rose above his chest. Mr. Saga said he
grabbed the baby and ran up the stairs. Many of those still at the foot of the stairs were washed away.

He joined about 200 people on the second floor of the building. The
baby’s mother rushed upstairs, and he put the baby into her arms. From the windows, they watched uprooted homes and cars flowing by on the wave. People did not speak, he said. They just cried and moaned, a collective “Ahhhh!” as they watched the destruction unfold. He saw one of his classmates, whose parents had gone back home to get something as the wave came and did not make it to the school. His friend sat on the floor, in tears.


【 まずは準備運動 】

・hamlet 小村落
・corrugate 波形をつける、しわを寄せる
・privation (人から物を)奪うこと、剥奪、欠乏
・snarl (問題・交通などを)混乱させる、(髪などを)もつれさせる
・clog (管などを)詰まらせる、(道路などを)ふさぐ
・muster (勇気などを)奮い起こす、召集する
・uproot 根こそぎにする


【 泳ぐときには息継ぎしなくちゃ 】

Hirosato Wako stared at the ruins of his small fishing hamlet: /
ヒロサト・ワコウは彼の小さな漁村の残骸を見つめた /

skeletons of shattered buildings,
粉砕された建物の骨格

twisted lengths of corrugated steel,
ひねられた波形をつけられた鋼鉄の長さ

corpses with their hands twisted into claws.
鉤爪へとひねられた彼らの手を持った遺体

Only once before had he seen anything like it:
以前に一度だけ彼はこのようなものを見たことがあった

World War II.
第二次世界大戦


“I lived through the Sendai air raids,”
「私は仙台空襲を生き抜いた」

said Mr. Wako, 75,
ワコウさん75歳は言った

referring to the Allied bombings of the northeast’s largest city.
北東の最大の都市の連合された爆撃に言及しながら

“But this is much worse.”
「しかしこれはもっとひどいものだ」


For the elderly who live in the villages
村に暮らすお年寄りにとって

lining Japan’s northeastern coast,
日本の北東の海岸を列をなしている

it is a return to a past of privation
それは剥奪の過去へのリターンだ

that their children have never known.
それを彼らの子供たちは決して知らない

As in so much of the Japanese countryside,
日本の田舎のとても多くでのように

young people have largely fled,
若い人々は概して逃げた

looking for work in the city.
都市において仕事を探しながら

The elderly who remained
残ったお年寄りは

are facing devastation and possible radiation contamination,
荒廃と可能な放射能汚染に直面している

a challenge equal only to the task this generation faced
この世代が直面した仕事にだけ等しいチャレンジ

when its defeated, despairing nation had to rebuild
その敗退させられた絶望している国が再建しなければならなかった

from the rubble of the war.
戦争のがれきから


In this hamlet of Yuriage,
このゆりあげの小村落において

the search for survivors was turning into a search for bodies.
生存者の捜索は体の捜索へと変わっていた

And most of those bodies were old --
それらの体のほとんどは高齢だった

too old to have outrun the tsunami.
ツナミより速く走るにはあまりにも高齢な


Yuta Saga, 21, was picking up broken cups after the earthquake
ユウタ・サガ21歳は地震の後で壊れたカップを拾っていた

when he heard sirens and screams of “Tsunami!”
彼がサイレンと「ツナミ!」の叫び声を聞いたときに

He grabbed his mother by the arm
彼は彼の母を腕によって掴んだ

and ran to the junior high school,
そして中学校に走った

the tallest building around.
あたりでもっとも高い建物

Traffic snarled the streets
交通は通りをもつれさせていた

as panicked drivers crashed into one another.
パニックになった運転者が互いに衝突した

He could measure the wave’s advance
彼は波の前進を測ることができた

by the clouds of dust created by collapsing buildings.
崩れている建物によって作られたほこりの雲によって


When they reached the school,
彼らが学校に着いたときに

Mr. Saga and his mother
サガさんと彼の母親は

found the stairs to the roof clogged with older people
屋上への階段がお年寄りで詰まっているのを見つけた

who appeared unable to muster the strength to climb them.
彼らはそれらを上るための力を奮い起こすことができないように見えた

Some were just sitting or lying on the steps.
ある人たちはただ座っていたりあるいは階段に横になっていた

As the bottom floor filled with fleeing residents,
一階が逃げる住民で満ちたときに

the wave hit.
波が打った


At first, the doors held.
最初はドアはホールドしていた

Then water began to pour through the seams and flow into the room.
それから水は縫い目を通じて注ぎ始めそして部屋の中へ流れた

In a panic to reach the roof,
屋上に着くためのパニックの中で

younger residents began pushing and yelling,
より若い住民は押すことをそして叫ぶことを始めた

“Hurry!” and “Out of the way!”
「急げ!」そして「道の外へ!」

They climbed over those who were not moving,
彼らは動いていない人たちの上に上った

or elbowed them aside.
あるいは彼らを脇に肘で押した


“I couldn’t believe it,”
「私はそれを信じられなかった」

Mr. Saga said.
サガさんは言った

“They were even shoving old people out of the way.
「彼らはお年寄りを道の外へ突くことさえした

The old people couldn’t save themselves.”
お年寄りは彼ら自身を救うことができない」


He added,
彼は加えた

“People didn’t care about others.”
「人々は他人に気を配らなかった」


Then the doors burst open,
それからドアが破裂して開いた

and the water rushed in.
そして水がどっと流れ込んだ

It was quickly waist level.
それはすぐに腰のレベルだった

Mr. Saga saw one older woman,
サガさんは一人のお年寄りの女性を見た

without the strength or will to stand,
立つための力または意志もない

sitting in water that rose to her nose.
彼女の鼻まで上がった水の中に座っている

He said
彼は言った

he rushed behind her,
彼は彼女の後ろに急行した

grabbed her under the arms
腕の下で彼女を掴んだ

and hoisted her up the stairs.
そして階段の上へ彼女を持ち上げた

Another person on the stairs grabbed her
階段の上の別の人が彼女を掴んだ

and lifted her up to another person.
そして彼女を別の人に持ち上げた

The men formed a human chain,
人々は人間のチェーンを形成した

lifting the older residents and some children to the top.
年を取った住民や何人かの子供たちをてっぺんまで持ち上げながら


“I saw the ugly side of people,
「私は人々の醜い面を見た

and then I saw the good side,”
そしてそれから私は良い面をみた」

he said.
彼は言った

“Some people only thought of themselves.
「何人かの人々は彼ら自身のことを考えるだけだった

Others stopped to help.”
他の人たちは助けるために止まった」


Mr. Saga said
サガさんは言った

one woman handed him her infant.
一人の女性が彼に彼女の乳児を手渡した

“Please, at least save the baby!”
「どうか少なくとも赤ちゃんを救ってください!」

she pleaded
彼女は懇願した

as water rose above his chest.
水が彼の胸の上まで上がったときに

Mr. Saga said
サガさんは言った

he grabbed the baby and ran up the stairs.
彼は赤ちゃんを掴んだそして階段を走り上がった

Many of those still at the foot of the stairs
まだ階段のふもとの人々の多くは

were washed away.
遠くへ流された


He joined about 200 people on the second floor of the building.
彼は建物の二階での約200人に加わった

The baby’s mother rushed upstairs,
赤ちゃんの母親が二階へ急行した

and he put the baby into her arms.
そして彼は赤ちゃんを彼女の腕の中に置いた

From the windows,
窓から

they watched uprooted homes and cars flowing by on the wave.
彼らは根こそぎにされた家と波の上で流れ去る車を見つめた

People did not speak,
人々は話さなかった

he said.
彼は言った

They just cried and moaned, a collective “Ahhhh!”
彼らはただ泣いてそして集合的な「あああ!」をうめいた

as they watched the destruction unfold.
彼らが展開される破壊を見つめるときに

He saw one of his classmates,
彼は彼のクラスメートの一人を見た

whose parents had gone back home to get something
彼の両親は何かを得るために家に戻って行った

as the wave came and did not make it to the school.
波が来てそして学校にメーク・イットしなかった

His friend sat on the floor, in tears.
彼の友達は床に座っていた涙の中で


【 英語ってどんな海? 】

まだ安心はできませんが、途方もない地震と津波でした。聞けば、1000年に一度の規模だとか。でも、たかだか100年も生きられない人間だって捨てたものではありません。先日は、9日ぶりに80歳の老婆と少年が救出されるという知らせもありました。


【 日本の陸に上がってみると 】

東日本大震災、お年寄りの胸に去来する第二次大戦の恐怖
( New York Times )

ワコウ・ヒロサトさんは廃墟と化した小さな漁村を見詰めた。粉々になった骨組みだけの建物、波状にひん曲がった長い鋼鉄、鉤爪のように曲がった手をした遺体。これまでに一度だけこんな光景を見たことがある。第二次世界大戦だ。

「私は仙台空襲を生き延びた」と、ワコウさん(75歳)は言った。連合国軍による東北の最大都市への爆撃のことだ。「でも、これほどひどくはなかった」

日本の東北地方の海岸沿いの村々に暮らすお年寄りにとって、これは子供たちも知らないすべてを奪ったあの日の再現だ。日本の大半の地方と同じく、多くの若者は村を出て都市に職を求めた。村に残ったお年寄りが、荒廃と放射能汚染の可能性と向き合っている。この困難に匹敵するのはこの世代が向き合った試練だけだ。敗戦で絶望した日本は、あの時も戦争の瓦礫からの再建を迫られた。

閖上(ゆりあげ)地区での生存者の捜索は遺体の捜索になっていた。ほとんどの遺体はお年寄りだった。お年寄りだったから、津波を振り切ることができなかった。

サガ・ユウタ(21歳)さんは地震で割れたコップを拾っているときに、警報と「ツナミだ!」という叫び声を聞いた。母親の腕を掴んで、中学校に走った。周辺で最も高い建物だ。車や人の行き来で通りは混乱していた。運転していた人たちはうろたえ、衝突を繰り返した。サガさんには津波が迫ってくるのが分かった。建物の倒壊でもうもうと土煙が立ち上っていた。

サガさんと母親が学校に着いたとき、屋上への階段は多くのお年寄りたちで身動きできなかった。階段を上る力を振り絞ることもできないようだった。そこにただ座ったり横になったりしている人もいた。一階が逃げる住民でいっぱいになったとき、波が襲った。

当初、ドアは持ちこたえていた。やがて、水が隙間から注ぎ入り、部屋に流れ込んできた。屋上を求める混乱の中で、若い住民が強引に進み「急げ!」「どけ!」と叫び出した。動けない人たちを乗り越え、肘で押しのけた。

「信じられなかった」とサガさんは言った。「あの人たちはお年寄りを突き飛ばした。お年寄りは自力で逃げることができないのに」

サガさんは付け加えた。「人々は他人のことなどお構いなしだった」

やがて、ドアが破れて開くと、水がどっと流れ込んできた。たちまち腰の高さになった。サガさんはお年寄りの女性を見つけた。水の中に座り込んで、立ち上がる力や意志がないようだった。水は鼻の高さになっている。サガさんの話では、女性の背後に急いで回って、腋の下から彼女を掴んで階段へ引っぱり上げた。階段にいたもう一人が女性を掴んで持ち上げて、また別の人に渡した。人間の輪ができていた。こうしてお年寄りや数人の子供を屋上まで引き上げた。

「人々の醜い一面を見たが、良い一面も見た」と、サガさんは言った。「自分たちのことしか考えない人たちもいた。でも、他の人たちは立ち止まって救いの手を伸ばした」

サガさんの話では、一人の女性に乳児を手渡された。「せめて、この子だけは助けてください」。女性がそうすがったとき、水は胸元まで来ていた。サガさんは赤ちゃんを掴んで、階段を駆け上がった。まだ階段の下にいた人たちの多くは流された。

サガさんは建物の二階にいた約200人に加わった。母親が二階に駆け上がってきたので、その腕に赤ちゃんを返した。人々は窓から根こそぎにされた家々や波に押し流される車を見ていた。誰も話さなかった。泣きながら、一斉に「あああ!」とうめくだけだった。目の前では破壊が繰り広げられていた。サガさんは級友の一人を見つけた。彼の両親は何かを取りに家に引き返して波に襲われ、学校に戻ってくることはなかった。友人は床に座って、泣いていた。


【 もう一度、泳ごう 】

For Elderly, Echoes of World War II Horrors
( New York Times )

Hirosato Wako stared at the ruins of his small fishing hamlet: skeletons of shattered buildings, twisted lengths of corrugated steel, corpses with their hands twisted into claws. Only once before had he seen anything like it: World War II.

“I lived through the Sendai air raids,” said Mr. Wako, 75, referring to the Allied bombings of the northeast’s largest city. “But this is much worse.”

For the elderly who live in the villages lining Japan’s northeastern
coast, it is a return to a past of privation that their children have
never known. As in so much of the Japanese countryside, young people
have largely fled, looking for work in the city. The elderly who remained are facing devastation and possible radiation contamination, a challenge equal only to the task this generation faced when its defeated, despairing nation had to rebuild from the rubble of the war.

In this hamlet of Yuriage, the search for survivors was turning into a
search for bodies. And most of those bodies were old -- too old to have outrun the tsunami.

Yuta Saga, 21, was picking up broken cups after the earthquake when he heard sirens and screams of “Tsunami!” He grabbed his mother by the arm and ran to the junior high school, the tallest building around. Traffic snarled the streets as panicked drivers crashed into one another. He could measure the wave’s advance by the clouds of dust created by collapsing buildings.

When they reached the school, Mr. Saga and his mother found the stairs to the roof clogged with older people who appeared unable to muster the strength to climb them. Some were just sitting or lying on the steps. As the bottom floor filled with fleeing residents, the wave hit.

At first, the doors held. Then water began to pour through the seams and flow into the room. In a panic to reach the roof, younger residents began pushing and yelling, “Hurry!” and “Out of the way!” They climbed over those who were not moving, or elbowed them aside.

“I couldn’t believe it,” Mr. Saga said. “They were even shoving old people out of the way. The old people couldn’t save themselves.”

He added, “People didn’t care about others.”

Then the doors burst open, and the water rushed in. It was quickly waist level. Mr. Saga saw one older woman, without the strength or will to
stand, sitting in water that rose to her nose. He said he rushed behind her, grabbed her under the arms and hoisted her up the stairs. Another person on the stairs grabbed her and lifted her up to another person. The men formed a human chain, lifting the older residents and some children to the top.

“I saw the ugly side of people, and then I saw the good side,” he said. “Some people only thought of themselves. Others stopped to help.”

Mr. Saga said one woman handed him her infant. “Please, at least save the baby!” she pleaded as water rose above his chest. Mr. Saga said he
grabbed the baby and ran up the stairs. Many of those still at the foot of the stairs were washed away.

He joined about 200 people on the second floor of the building. The
baby’s mother rushed upstairs, and he put the baby into her arms. From the windows, they watched uprooted homes and cars flowing by on the wave. People did not speak, he said. They just cried and moaned, a collective “Ahhhh!” as they watched the destruction unfold. He saw one of his classmates, whose parents had gone back home to get something as the wave came and did not make it to the school. His friend sat on the floor, in tears.


● 続き? 後は自力で英語の大海へ泳ぎ出そう。溺れても命は取られないからダイジョーV!
(古っ)
 ↓ ↓ ↓
http://nyti.ms/hi2q4i


● 編集後記

東京は震度5強。僕にとっても初めて体験する揺れでした。てっきり、震源地は関東周辺かと思いきや、その後に付けたテレビを見て絶句。東北の街や田畑や車や家が、現在進行形で津波に飲み込まれていく・・・。

あれから10日以上が経ちました。相変わらず原発は恐怖をくすぶらせ、余震も続いています。何より、復興の道のりは長く険しいでしょう。でも、ヨーグルトやコーラだけで9日間へっちゃらのお婆ちゃんがいる東北なら大丈夫です。応援しています!




posted by K.Andoh | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | 日本−社会
この記事へのコメント
コメントを書く
お名前:

メールアドレス:

ホームページアドレス:

コメント:

認証コード: [必須入力]


※画像の中の文字を半角で入力してください。

この記事へのトラックバック
×

この広告は1年以上新しい記事の投稿がないブログに表示されております。