2009年04月29日

日本にあった労働者の楽園


A Workers’ Paradise Found Off Japan’s Coast
( New York Times )

If Marxism had ever produced a functional, prosperous society, it might have looked something like this tiny southern Japanese island.

At first glance, there is little to set Hime apart from the hundreds of other small inhabited islands that dot the coasts of Japan’s main isles. The 2,519 mostly graying islanders subsist on fishing and shrimp farming, and every summer hold a Shinto religious festival featuring dancers dressed as foxes.

But once off the ferry, the island’s sole public transportation link to the outside, visitors are greeted by an unusual sight: a tall, bronze statue of Hime’s previous mayor, rare in a country that typically shuns such political aggrandizement. Rarer still is that the statue was erected by his son, who is the island’s current mayor.

And it is not just the cult-of-personality politics that smack of a latter-day workers’ paradise. This sleepy island, just off Japan’s main southern island, Kyushu, has recently come under unaccustomed national media attention for a very different reason: it invented its own version of work-sharing four decades before the current economic crisis popularized the term.


【 まずは準備運動 】

・subsist 生存する、やっと暮していく
・shun 避ける
・aggrandizement (権力、地位などの)強化
・cult 狂信的宗教、熱狂、(個人)崇拝
・smack 味・気味がある
・accustom 慣らす



【 泳ぐときには息継ぎしなくちゃ 】

If Marxism had ever produced a functional, prosperous society, /
もしマルクス主義が機能的で繁栄した社会を生んでいたとしたら /

it might have looked something /
あるものに見えていたかもしれない /

like this tiny southern Japanese island. /
この小さな南日本の島のような /


At first glance, /
ちらっと見において /

there is little to set Hime /
姫島を置くためのものは少ない /

apart from the hundreds of other small inhabited islands /
数百の他の小さな居住された島から離して /

that dot the coasts of Japan’s main isles. /
日本のメインの島の沿岸に点在する /

The 2,519 mostly graying islanders subsist /
2519人のほとんど灰色をしている島民は生存する /

on fishing and shrimp farming, /
漁業とエビの養殖で /

and every summer hold a Shinto religious festival /
毎夏に神道宗教の祭りを開く /

featuring dancers dressed as foxes. /
キツネとして服を着た踊り手をフューチャーしている /


But once off the ferry, /
しかしひとたびフェリーから離れると /

the island’s sole public transportation link to the outside, /
島の唯一の外部への輸送のつながり /

visitors are greeted by an unusual sight: /
訪問者は普通でない光景によって迎えられる /

a tall, bronze statue of Hime’s previous mayor, /
姫島の前村長の高いブロンズの彫像 /

rare in a country /
国においてまれだ /

that typically shuns such political aggrandizement. /
そのような政治的な権力の強化を典型的に避ける /

Rarer still is /
もっとまれだ /

that the statue was erected by his son, /
彫像が彼の息子によって立てられた /

who is the island’s current mayor. /
島の現在の村長だ /


And it is not just the cult-of-personality politics /
そしてただの個人の崇拝の政治ではない /

that smack of a latter-day workers’ paradise. /
現代の労働者の楽園の気味がある /

This sleepy island, /
この眠い島は /

just off Japan’s main southern island, Kyushu, /
日本のメインの南の島の九州から離れた /

has recently come under unaccustomed national media attention /
最近慣れない全国メディアの注目の下に来た /

for a very different reason: /
まったく違う理由のために /

it invented its own version of work-sharing /
それはワーキングシェアリングのそれ独自のバージョンを発明した /

four decades /
40年 /

before the current economic crisis popularized the term. /
現在の経済危機がその言葉をポピュラーにした以前の /


【 日本の陸に上がってみると 】

日本にあった労働者の楽園
( New York Times )

もしマルクス主義が豊かで無駄のない社会を生み出していたとしたら、それは南日本にあるこの小さな島のような姿をしていたかもしれない。

一見したところ、姫島を日本列島沿岸に点在し居住者のいる他の数百の小島から際立たせるものは少ない。ほとんどが白髪頭の2519人の島民は漁業やエビの養殖で生計を立て、毎夏、キツネの格好をした踊り手を呼び物にした神道の祭りを開く。

だが、島にとって外部との唯一の交通手段であるフェリーからひとたび降りた旅行者を迎えてくれるのは、一風変わった光景だ。すなわち、姫島の前村長の背の高いブロンズ像。政治的な権威を誇示することを避けるのを常とする国柄だから珍しいのだが、さらに珍しいのはその像を建てたのが前村長の息子だということで、彼こそが現在の村長なのだ。

そして、単に個人崇拝の政治のせいで、島に現代版・労働者の楽園の雰囲気があるわけではない。南日本の本島である九州の沖に位置するこの静かな島が近年、いつになく全国メディアの注目を集めているのはまったく別の理由による。姫島が独自の形態のワークシェアリングを編み出していたからだ。しかも、現在の経済危機によってこの言葉が普及する40年も前のことなのだ。


【 もう一度、泳ごう 】

A Workers’ Paradise Found Off Japan’s Coast
( New York Times )

If Marxism had ever produced a functional, prosperous society, it might have looked something like this tiny southern Japanese island.

At first glance, there is little to set Hime apart from the hundreds of other small inhabited islands that dot the coasts of Japan’s main isles. The 2,519 mostly graying islanders subsist on fishing and shrimp farming, and every summer hold a Shinto religious festival featuring dancers dressed as foxes.

But once off the ferry, the island’s sole public transportation link to the outside, visitors are greeted by an unusual sight: a tall, bronze statue of Hime’s previous mayor, rare in a country that typically shuns such political aggrandizement. Rarer still is that the statue was erected by his son, who is the island’s current mayor.

And it is not just the cult-of-personality politics that smack of a latter-day workers’ paradise. This sleepy island, just off Japan’s main southern island, Kyushu, has recently come under unaccustomed national media attention for a very different reason: it invented its own version of work-sharing four decades before the current economic crisis popularized the term.


● 続き? 後は自力で英語の大海へ泳ぎ出そう。溺れても命は取られないからダイジョーV!
(古っ)
 ↓ ↓ ↓
http://tinyurl.com/de43fq


● 編集後記

姫島の平等主義は徹底していて、成人式を迎える娘さんの着物も禁止なのだとか。それによって、各家庭の経済的な格差が現れてしまうからです。そういう楽園でも構わないという人には、まあ暮らしやすいんでしょうね。



posted by K.Andoh | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | 日本−社会
この記事へのコメント
コメントを書く
お名前:

メールアドレス:

ホームページアドレス:

コメント:

認証コード: [必須入力]


※画像の中の文字を半角で入力してください。
※ブログオーナーが承認したコメントのみ表示されます。

この記事へのトラックバック
×

この広告は1年以上新しい記事の投稿がないブログに表示されております。